5 Essential Tips for Better Formula One Photography

Grand Prix Formula One Photography Techniques

5 Essential Tips for Better Formula One Photography

This article is intended for readers looking to pick some basic tips in motor racing photography. The techniques shared, while relevant to most Formula One racing around the world, are skewed towards Singapore Grand Prix, which is unique as it is held at night. As such, there will not be tips on silhouetted, sunrise or sunset-based photography as the entire race track is evenly lit by 1600 strategically positioned lighting projectors.

5 Essential Tips for Better Formula One Photography

Tip #1 – Know and Use the Right Gears

The first start point, other than understanding the exposure triangle, is using the right gears. Formula One photography is one field that current Smartphone or compact camera technology is still not quite up to the mark.

A good DSLR camera paired with quality lenses will go a long way to enjoying a fruitful outing at the track. A mid-range camera with superb auto-focus capabilities like the Canon EOS80D or EOS7Dmk2 with longer zoom lenses like EF100-400mm L Lens would be a great choice. Of course, full-frame models like the 1DXii or 5DmkIV would be ideal should the budget allows. Spend some time before the race familiarising with the camera and lens controls should it be new. You don’t want to be panicking trying to figure out how to change the shutter speed, ISO or aperture during a race.

Tip #2 – Get Your Panning Right

5 Essential Tips for Better Formula One Photography by Jensen Chua Photography

Panning is the technique of using a slow shutter speed to impart motion to a still photo while keeping a part of the image sharp. This practice is indispensable in action and motorsport photography. It is a crucial skill to learn as otherwise, the speeding cars will be recorded as blurred (shutter speed too slow) or look like it’s parked on the track (shutter speed too fast). As you lower the shutter speed, the background ‘streaks’ starts to blur even more. My personal “sweet spot” for achieving a fine balance between blurriness and sharpness is between 1/60-1/100s. That is keeping in mind which sector the cars are in.

A car coming in fast on a straight lane would require 1/100 while those just roaring out of the paddock would do well with 1/30-1/60. The trick is, you have to find your equilibrium. For creative pictures where colour, light and lines ‘merged” you can try 1/15 range and below. Conversely, shutter speed above 1/800s will render spinning tyres in ‘frozen’ state.

The path to successful panning is to have a steady balance, elbow closed to your body, feet shoulder-width apart and follow the car with a smooth swinging motion. It takes a lot of practice (and lots of spoilt shots) to get the feel of it and to start getting more sharp photos than misfocused ones. For open wheel cars, the objective is to have the driver’s helmet sharp. With closed cockpit cars, the side of the car or front of the car is crucial for ‘keepers’ (pictures you can use).

5 Essential Tips for Better Formula One Photography by Jensen Chua Photography

As tripod legs will hinder or trip other spectators in the crowded area and simply takes up too much space, it is usually disallowed by most track circuit management. A monopod, in this case, would be a valuable accessory to ensure even better panning experience as well as sharper pictures.

Tip #3 – Study the Circuit and Pick your Track

All tracks are unique in their design and this impact the pictures you can achieve. Some are much easier to make pretty pictures at while others are simply not designed for photography.

5 Essential Tips for Better Formula One Photography by Jensen Chua Photography

The Pit Straight lane at the Singapore Marina Bay Circuit, shot from the Club Suite, Apex Lounge. Great section to watch cars attempting to overtake each other but not an ideal location for great eye-level angles.

5 Essential Tips for Better Formula One Photography by Jensen Chua Photography

The key obstacle to great picture opportunity is the race track fencing. Any position where you have elevation and away from barriers will make your life easier. Unless you have media accreditation pass that gives you unfettered access, then a long lens (ideally between 300mm-600mm) with a fast aperture (F2-F4) would be recommended to “melt” away the fence, using the lens shallow depth of field. The trick is to position yourself as close as possible to the fence and shoot through the openings. Do be advised though, that the fence wires may be reflected on bokeh balls.

5 Essential Tips for Better Formula One Photography by Jensen Chua Photography

Other than studying the track circuit map, read online F1 blogs for information or talk to fellow photographers during the waiting time before the race commencement to catch up on information on alternative photo spots. You will be surprised how helpful fellow shutterbugs are in sharing useful tips and may even forge new friendships with like-minded people.

Position at the turns where drivers have to slow down give the best opportunity to capture that close up in sharp focus with relative lower ISO, for cleaner shots.

Tip #4 – Understand the Concept of Shutter Speed

Most photographers know the safest way to get a sharp picture is to use the fastest possible shutter speed. But high shutter speed itself may not be applicable at times. That is where understanding the cause and effect of shutter speed is vital.

5 Essential Tips for Better Formula One Photography by Jensen Chua Photography

By shooting at 1/100s, F4, ISO400. I was able to capture the sparks in longer flowing form compared to the picture below, which was shot at 1/400, F4, ISO1600, where the sparks are rendered in little sparks. Depending on the effect you desired, a thorough awareness of shutter speed and its effect is important.

5 Essential Tips for Better Formula One Photography by Jensen Chua Photography

Tip #5 – Use Fringe Events to Practice

Fringe racing events are usually arranged within Formula One race. Like in Singapore GP, Ferrari Challenge Asia Pacific and Porsche Carrera Cup Asia are a regular fixture on the circuit. These supporting races are perfect to warm up your shooting and panning practise before the actual F1 race, apart from adding fun and variety to the photo portfolio.

5 Essential Tips for Better Formula One Photography by Jensen Chua Photography

Ferrari 488 GTB roaring along the track. Shot at 1/320, F4, ISO1600.

 

5 Essential Tips for Better Formula One Photography by Jensen Chua Photography

A Porsche 911 GT3 (Type 991) tearing up the track at 1/50s, F13, ISO100.

5 Essential Tips for Better Formula One Photography by Jensen Chua Photography

Duelling Porsches at 1/60, F8, ISo100.

Conclusion

A good way to learn is to find some inspiration from the many motorsport photographers on social media. My favourite F1 photographer has to be Darren Heath and Peter J Fox. But never fall into the trap of copying other photographers’ style. Strive and hone your skill with continuous practice. The F1 race might only be an annual event, but there many other sporting events throughout the year to finetune and cultivate that creative edge. Please feel free to have look at my other photo techniques page for further reference. My sincere appreciation for reading my article.

Footnote: All pictures used in this article are copyrighted and all rights reserved. The material and content on the site are for personal and non-commercial usage only

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *